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The Lego Group: Iconic bricks find the better model

Published: February 2013 · Publisher: MarketLine
LEGO is a privately held company, engaged in providing toys and teaching materials for children in over 130 countries. The company also offers preschool products and games. It operates in Europe, the US, Australia and Asia. The company is ...
Report Type Case Studies
Language English
Format Electronic (PDF)
Pages15
Frequency Updated Annually
Availability Will be emailed within 1 business day
Reference No. 0109-2813
Price € 369,00
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Introduction

LEGO is a privately held company, engaged in providing toys and teaching materials for children in over 130 countries. The company also offers preschool products and games. It operates in Europe, the US, Australia and Asia. The company is headquartered in Billund, Denmark, and employs around 9,374 people.

Features and benefits

* The publisher's Case Studies describe topics such as innovative products, business models, and significant company acquisitions.
* Fact-based and presented in an accessible style, they explain the rationale of commercial decisions and illustrate wider market and economic trends.

Highlights

The negative financial facts which precipitated a change in leadership, something which meant the end of family control. By focusing on what the company did best, where its strengths lie, and where it’s often unaccounted for, intangible value was, the Lego Group managed to improve its margins to a notable size.

Your key questions answered

* What happened to the Lego Group over the years 1999 to 2011?
* How did the Lego Group turnaround its financial position?
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OVERVIEW
Catalyst
Summary
FACTORING IN FOR LEADERSHIP CHANGE
The Facts
(the end of) Family Control
Operational Issues
A BLOATED SUPPLY CHAIN AND LOGISTICS
Too Much Lego
A Culture Bad for Business
A New Disposition to Change
A BLOATED SUPPLY CHAIN AND CASH FLOW
Too Many Suppliers
Reform and Correcting Cash Flow
THE CREATION OF A MARKET-ORIENTATED PRODUCT RANGE
Enabling Finances
A Change in Strategy
Selling on Identity
A NEW FOCUS ON AN OLD PRODUCT AND A RETURN TO PROFIT
Remembering What the Company Does
Bad Decision-Making
Intangibles Made the Difference
CONCLUSIONS
The company was failing to jointly satisfy the conditions of successful financial business.
APPENDIX
Definitions
Sources
Further Reading
Ask the analyst
About the publisher
Disclaimer
Copyright © FriedlNet. You may share using our tools Please don't cut content from FriedlNet and redistribute by email or post to the web.